Please do share! You and I do seem to be on the same wavelength, each of us coming from opposite ends and meeting in the middle.

I have to admit at one point I was on the wrong side of this. It has taken me a while to make the journey, to find our lights.

Among other things I have learned on my long journey to the light is that it is ok to have been wrong, to have been blinded to the truth by looking through a lens distorted by unconscious racism. Or misogyny. Or any other destructive, alienating thinking.

Once you can say, “You are right. I was wrong. Thank you helping me see the light. Now let’s find out what kind of world we can build together.”

It is ever so hard for men to admit they were wrong when a woman sets them right. White women [and white men] have the same kind resistance to admitting they were wrong. Hmmm. What is it that both situations have in common?

Oh yes.

Power. The power to define reality.

It is wonderfully freeing to be able to admit error and not lose self esteem in the admission. It means you don’t have waste energy bending over backward to defend your wrong-headedness. It means unity is possible. It means we can grow in unity — a unity that does not demand one side silence their truths in the name of a false unity.

We’re human. We make mistakes. We heal, and grow stronger together.

Retired professor, feminist, writer, photographer, activist, grandmother of 5, overall Wise Woman. Phd UIA School of Journalism & Mass Communication, 1994.

Retired professor, feminist, writer, photographer, activist, grandmother of 5, overall Wise Woman. Phd UIA School of Journalism & Mass Communication, 1994.