Without being able to see the context & specific contents of "men bashing" comments you identify, it's hard for me to offer a precise, accurate (as proven by examples) assessment of this surprising phenomenon.

Nonetheless, my first gut reaction was this: I suspect the men whose comments are covered by the phrase "bashing men" don't see their comments as "bashing" but rather as stating a reality excusing men from responsibility for their "gut reactions" to women's bodies within which their sexual objectification of women. Rather, said objectification of women is "natural" -- hardwired into men's brains by their Y chromosome -- and therefore "acceptable."

If I'm wrong in that interpretation, please let me know.

My response to any and all claims that these social behaviors are burned into their Y chromosome is this:

Ok, what then explains all the folks with that Y chromosome who DON'T habitually sexually objectify women? How did they come into being if those behaviors are attached to a chromosome shared by all "men"?

Could it POSSIBLY be that -- INSTEAD-- those very same supposedly INHERITED, "natural" behaviors across time and distance are in fact solid, objective evidence of the social distribution of power via the structural phenomenon of PATRIARCHY?

That is, could it not be that the social structure identified by theoretical feminism (aka feminist philosophy, sociology, and political theory), undergirds ALL social relationships?

Argument continued here:

TITLE: Patriarchy as a “natural” phenomenon required to reproduce the human race.

SUBTITLE: ARGUMENTS FAVORING “PATRIARCHY” AS A “NATURAL” SOCIAL ARRANGEMENT OF POWER ARE AS BOGUS AS DONALD TRUMP’S “HAIR”

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Retired professor, feminist, writer, photographer, activist, grandmother of 5, overall Wise Woman. Phd UIA School of Journalism & Mass Communication, 1994.

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Georgia NeSmith

Georgia NeSmith

Retired professor, feminist, writer, photographer, activist, grandmother of 5, overall Wise Woman. Phd UIA School of Journalism & Mass Communication, 1994.